Narcissus are Daffodils
Inspiration for Art
Narcissus are Daffodils
+
"I’m not going to address that question. If I bring up political power, personal power, it sounds like they’re my terms, and they’re not. They’re yours. I think that I’m trying to engage issues of power and sexuality and money and life and death and power. Power is the most free-flowing element in society, maybe next to money, but in fact they both motor each other. And it’s everywhere. And it’s in this room right now, it’s at every dinner table, every board room, every bedroom; every social situation is rife with the consequences of power. And I feel compelled to address that, because it is the major constituent in demonizing what our lives feel like, what our every-days feel like, what our days and nights feel like." — Barbara Kruger, "Egg the Arts Show Interview"
"Untitled (Your body is a battleground)," 1990Billboard, commissioned by the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, for its “New Works for New Spaces: Into the Nineties” exhibitionPhoto by Fredrik Marsh 
"Untitled (I shop, therefore I am)," 1987Photographic silkscreen on vinyl, 111 x 113 inches
"I’m not going to address that question. If I bring up political power, personal power, it sounds like they’re my terms, and they’re not. They’re yours. I think that I’m trying to engage issues of power and sexuality and money and life and death and power. Power is the most free-flowing element in society, maybe next to money, but in fact they both motor each other. And it’s everywhere. And it’s in this room right now, it’s at every dinner table, every board room, every bedroom; every social situation is rife with the consequences of power. And I feel compelled to address that, because it is the major constituent in demonizing what our lives feel like, what our every-days feel like, what our days and nights feel like." — Barbara Kruger, "Egg the Arts Show Interview"
"Untitled (Your body is a battleground)," 1990Billboard, commissioned by the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, for its “New Works for New Spaces: Into the Nineties” exhibitionPhoto by Fredrik Marsh 
"Untitled (I shop, therefore I am)," 1987Photographic silkscreen on vinyl, 111 x 113 inches
+
"I remember going into galleries and seeing this thing called conceptual art, and I understood people’s marginalization from what the art subculture is because if you haven’t crashed the codes, and if you don’t know what it is, you feel it’s a conspiracy against your unintelligence. You feel it’s fraud."
Barbara Kruger, “Interview: Barbara Kruger”
+
"For the piece I’ve just completed, I placed two 600-pound boulders on top of each other. For five or six hours a day, I pushed a horizontal pole that moved the top rock around like a mill. The idea is that these two forms carve into one another and at some stage the two forms marry. I wanted a sculpture where I had two objects that resisted and gave into each other at an equal rate. And I had this idea in my mind that it would be finished when I created a completely flat surface between these two rocks where, visually, these two forms would become one. This flat surface would be about the relationship. As I worked, I realized one rock had parts that were harder than the other. It wasn’t becoming flat. I could have tried to force it, but what happened was so much more beautiful than I could have predicted. The bottom of the top rock started to curve like an upside down bowl. And so on one side you have a ball and socket where the rocks grip each other and then a beautiful arch where you can see straight through. On the other side the rocks tough ever so gently. The relationship is so dynamic, so full of potential, and much more visually interesting than two flat surfaces. The rocks from afar look married; then when you bend down to look at the place of contact…it’s really a pretty complex relationship. This made me rethink the piece; it’s about how some parts of us are stronger than others, and how in relationships there is a balance between the strong parts and the weak parts. That’s what makes a relationship interesting and what keeps it dynamic—when one comes in and supports the other."
Janine Antoni, “Bombsite Interview”
+
"In terms of the way I try to approach things that I don’t understand in the world or the things that offend me. When you know where someone is coming from, you put yourself in their position, even, if its is a really difficult thing to do, it helps you open up and gives you access."
Janine Antoni, “Bombsite”
+
"I would prefer not to define feminism because I feel like I would like to think of feminism as something that is fluid and that responds to the changing roles of women in society. I think feminism has got into the most trouble when its become dogmatic and rigid about its definition. And I think that young artists are afraid to call themselves feminists because they’re looking at an old definition of the word."
Janine Antoni, “Transcript from interview, Women Art Revolution”
+
"

I think reclaiming our representation from art history is also a very important innovation. I think that women have been represented throughout art history, and us being able to represent ourselves has created dramatic changes in the way we’re perceived, and the way we perceive ourselves. […]

I feel like one of the most important innovations in feminist art is our opportunity to reclaim our own image, which I think has been used throughout art history by male artists. So to reclaim it and to define it for ourselves is probably the most important innovation I can see.

"
Janine Antoni, “Transcript from interview, Women Art Revolution”
+
"When I first started to make art, the question that would come up in interviews was, ‘Oh women are starting to make interesting art now.’ And so that was always an opportunity for me to point back to that time and say, ‘Women have always been making interesting art, but people weren’t listening.’"
Janine Antoni, “Transcript from interview, Women Art Revolution”
+
"Some of the artists that I love the most, some of the artworks that I love the most, are artworks that I never experienced. They were performances that were stories told to me by my professors at school or by other artists. I suspect that they’re a bit like a fairy tale or a myth, because I think that they’re retold according to our lives and what we’re interested in at the time. And so, that story evolved and changes according to our needs."
Janine Antoni, “Touch and Moor”
+
"And I think that, when we look at the tight-wire walkers, we think, ‘They’re walking on air.’ And that idea just sort of triggers the imagination. It’s like—it’s impossible. So, then I thought, ‘Okay, if I could walk on air, if I could walk anywhere, where would I walk?’ And that brought me to the horizon line. It’s another impossible place to walk. It’s not a place. It doesn’t exist.
The video allows me to create the illusion. The video is like the wire. It creates one singular view, which allows me to rest on the horizon with the wire. Of course, in the video, I only rest there for a moment. And I could have had a blue screen and manipulated the whole thing and seamlessly walked the horizon, but that didn’t seem so interesting to me. For me, it was really about: what is that desire? And to just be able to balance there for a second was a way of bringing you to the point of that desire and then taking it away. It allows us to think about where that comes from.” — Janine Antoni, “Touch and Moor.”
+
"I think I was thinking about purity in terms of women, and that is a kind of idealized state, which of course is in contrast with chocolate. Another way that women have been though about is in terms of desire. So, the work is about looking at the flip side of these two states and not feeling comfortable with either.
The brown and white—really, with all of my work—it comes from the material. So, I’m not so much thinking of my self in a dark color and my self in a white color. I’m thinking of my self in chocolate and my self in soap. Bu there is something beautiful about the way that, in her purity, she disappears.” — Janine Antoni, “Lick and lather”
"Lick and Lather," detail, 19937 soap and 7 chocolate self-portrait busts, 24 x 16 x 13 inches eachCollection of Jeffrey Deitch, New YorkPhoto by John Bessler